Ricardo Bofill

La Muralla Roja

La Muralla Roja, Spanish for ‘The Red Wall,’ is a post modernist housing project located in the area of Calpe in the Alicante region in Spain.  Designed by architect Ricardo Bofill, the building appears as if it is emerging from the rocky cliffs it sits on.

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

The structure is heavily influenced by the North African tradition of the casbah, a fort with high walls and few windows. The striking colours that cover the outer and inner facades are selected to either contrast with nature or complement its purity.

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

The 50 apartments of the project a are linked by a series of uniform stairs, landings and bridges, giving the impression of interlocking cubes. The variations of spaces connect create a labyrinthine complex of shifting and ambiguous scale, designed to a precise geometric plan based on the typology of the Greek cross.

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

La Muralla Roja | Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura

All images courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Kafka Castle by Ricardo Bofill

Known for his innovative and colorful structures Catalan architect, Ricardo Bofill and his multidisciplinary firm, Taller de Arquitectura collaborated on the design of a unique apartment complex outside of Barcelona.

Completed in 1968, the Kafka Castle –an homage to Franz Kafka – strays away from the traditional design techniques and aesthetics of typical Spanish apartment buildings.  Rather than a development through site, plan, and context, Bofill implemented a series of mathematical equations that generated the position of all ninety dwellings, as well as the Kafka Castle’s siting.