inspiration

Musée Yves Saint Laurent

A new museum dedicated to the work and life of the legendary French couturier Yves Saint Laurent has opened in Marrakech. Designed by Studio KO,  the 4,000-square-metre building sits a short distance away from Jardin Majorelle, the home acquired by Sanit Laurent and Pierre Bergé in 1980.

Yves Saint Laurent museum

Image © studio KO

 

Kazuo Ohno

Kazuo Ohno, was a Japanese dancer and one of the pioneers of Butoh (“dance of utter darkness), the influential Japanese dance-theater form. With its playful and grotesque imagery, taboo topics, characters with whitened faces, its slow movements and physical distortions, Butoh was a reaction in part to the horrors World War II.

Ohno’s solo performances were irresistibly powerful. A humanist, he communicated the themes of the form through recognisable characters, most often flamboyantly female.

Ohno had continued to perform beyond his 100th year, until his death in 2010 at the age of 103.

Photo by Eikoh Hosoe

Photo by Eikoh Hosoe

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Image result for kazuo ohno

Image result for kazuo ohno

Saul Leiter

“I LIKE IT WHEN ONE IS NOT CERTAIN WHAT ONE SEES.” – SAUL LEITER 

Saul Leiter was an American artist and early pioneer of colour photography. With distinctive imagery suffused with painterly qualities.

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Postmen, 1952

Saul Leiter - Driver, 1950s - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter - Parade, 1954 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter - Walking, 1956 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

“Don’t Walk” by Saul Leiter, 1952. Published in ‘Early Color’ (Seidl, 2006)

Saul Leiter - Lanesville, 1958 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter - Paris, 1959 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter - Harlem, 1960 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter - Through Boards, 1957 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter - Foot on El, 1954 - Howard Greenberg Gallery

Saul Leiter: Red Umbrella (1958)

liquidnight: Saul Leiter Shopper, 1953. From Saul Leiter (Steidl)Leiter’s Carol Brown, Harper’s Bazaar (1958)

Saul Leiter Photography

Saul Leiter Photography

 

All images © Saul Leiter, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

 

Still I Rise – Poem by Maya Angelou

You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may tread me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I’ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don’t you take it awful hard
‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines
Diggin’ in my own back yard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I’ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history’s shame
I rise
Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
I rise
I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

Casa Malaparte

Casa  Malaparte (Villa Malaparte), built in 1938 by the Rationalist architect Adalberto Libera on Punta Massullo, eastern side of Isle of Capri, is considered to be one of the best examples of Italian modern and contemporary architecture.

Case Malaparte  is a red structure with inverted pyramid stairs leading to the roof Patio. On the roof is a freestanding curving white wall of increasing height. It sits 32 meters over a cliff on the Gulf of Salerno. It is completely isolated from civilization, only accessible by foot or by boat.

The house was commissioned by the Italian writer, Curzio Malaparte whose eccentric character eventually led him to dominate the design process, causing serious conflict with Libera. Malaparte wanted the house to reflect his own personal character and become a place for solitary contemplation and writing. Malaparte once said: “Now I live on an island, in an austere and melancholy house, which I built myself on a lonely cliff above the sea. [It is] the image of my desire.

Casa Malaparte was featured in Jean-Luc Godard‘s 1963 film, Le Mépris (Contempt).

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casa malaparte:

 

Villa-Malaparte-François-Halard-010

Photo by Francois Halard

Brigitte Bardot and Michel Piccoli in  Le Mepris

Brigitte Bardot, Jack Palance and Michel Piccoli in Le Mepris

Michel Piccoli as Paul Javal in Le Mepris

Source:

http://francoishalard.com/photography/malaparte/

http://arquiscopio.com/archivo/2012/12/08/casa-de-curzio-malaparte/

Isle of Capri’s strange and seductive Casa Malaparte

Sometimes The Sky’s Too Bright – – Dylan Thomas

Sometimes the sky’s too bright,
Or has too many clouds or birds,
And far away’s too sharp a sun
To nourish thinking of him.
Why is my hand too blunt
To cut in front of me
My horrid images for me,
Of over-fruitful smiles,
The weightless touching of the lip
I wish to know
I cannot lift, but can,
The creature with the angel’s face
Who tells me hurt,
And sees my body go
Down into misery?
No stopping. Put the smile
Where tears have come to dry.
The angel’s hurt is left;
His telling burns.

Sometimes a woman’s heart has salt,
Or too much blood;
I tear her breast,
And see the blood is mine,
Flowing from her, but mine,
And then I think
Perhaps the sky’s too bright;
And watch my hand,
But do not follow it,
And feel the pain it gives,
But do not ache.